online security

Protecting Against an Increase in Zeus Attacks

Last week, it was reported by eWeek that the source code for the Zeus Banking Trojan was released on the Internet. Previously, the source code was not distributed but instead Zeus was sold as a builder kit for thousands of dollars so cybercriminals could easily build attacks but had to make money just like a business. Now, Zeus is free AND the source code is available.

The fact that it’s available for free means that we will likely see a larger number of Zeus attacks launched by less sophisticated cybercriminals. However, to truly capitalize on Zeus there still needs to be a certain infrastructure in place to move the money around and/or sell the stolen identities. It remains to be seen how successful any new attacks will be on a large scale.

However, with access to the source code, more sophisticated cybercriminals can creatively repackage Zeus or modify the code to better evade detection by security software. In addition to banking sites, other e-commerce sites may now be vulnerable and/or new forms of malware with Zeus components may be used to launch attacks.

The Need for Enterprise Security Practices in Home Networks

With the number of online threats increasing, it’s not surprising that enterprises spend billions each year to protect their networks, devices and communications. Businesses large and small deploy a number of security products to protect their assets including:

Security Misconception 5: Facebook is safe enough; no need to worry

When Kindsight took to the streets, we found five key misconceptions about cybersecurity including the one in this video: Facebook is safe enough; no need to worry.

Security Misconception 4: I’m safe because it’s easy to recognize fake sites

When Kindsight took to the streets, we found five key misconceptions about cybersecurity including the one in this video: I’m safe because it’s easy to recognize fake sites.

Security Misconception 3: I’m safe because the website is secure

When Kindsight took to the streets, we found five key misconceptions about cybersecurity including the one in this video: I’m safe because the website is secure.

Security Misconception 2: I’m safe because I have anti-virus protection

When Kindsight took to the streets, we found five key misconceptions about cybersecurity including the one in this video: I’m safe because I have anti-virus protection.

Security Misconception 1: I'm safe because I never shop online

When Kindsight took to the streets, we found five key misconceptions about cybersecurity including the one in this video: I’m safe because I never shop online.

Kindsight Uncovers Consumers’ Top Security Misconceptions

We recently took to the streets to see what consumers really knew about keeping themselves safe while surfing the web. 

Even with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s recent National Cybersecurity Awareness Month and recent widespread virus scares, it appears that many consumers still are not entirely sure of what type of activities to avoid, and what they can do to protect their identities online. Kindsight spoke with people in San Francisco’s bustling Union Square recently, and five key misconceptions about cybersecurity emerged:

Online ID Protection Tip 5: Monitor Your Credit Score and Bank Accounts

This post is the final one in our series on Tips to Protect Your Identity Online. Today, we’ll look at some things you can do offline if you’re concerned that your identity may or has been stolen. The good news is that many of these steps don’t necessarily cost money but they do take a bit of time. Identity theft can happen both online and offline so it’s important to protect yourself from both angles.

Online ID Protection Tip 4: Create Secure Passwords

This post continues our Tips to Protect your Identity Online series. Earlier this week we covered the third tip, Think Twice About What You Share on Social Networks. Today, we’ll look at how to create more secure passwords.